The Pink Ribbon

But first . . .Cleaning for a Reason Pink Ribbon Logo

This month is the perfect time to introduce our readers who aren’t already familiar with it to Cleaning for a Reason®, a non-profit organization that gives the gift of a free house cleaning to women undergoing treatment for any type of cancer. Visit the website and hear president and founder Debbie Sardone talk about Cleaning for a Reason here. This organization has helped countless women over the years and is very near and dear to the Speed Cleaning team.

How did the pink ribbon come to symbolize breast cancer awareness?

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and everywhere we look we’re seeing pink. In fact, Speed Cleaning is offering a free pink micro fiber cloth for the week of October 7 to the 13th when customers order Stain Assassin. But how did the color pink and the pink ribbon become associated with breast cancer awareness and support?

Let’s start at the beginning:

♦  The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation was formed in 1982, and incorporated the feminine color pink in its marketing materials.

♦  In 1990, the first Susan G. Komen breast cancer survivor program was developed and the prominent use of pink was chosen to promote awareness and its programs.

♦  In 1991, the red ribbon became the symbol for awareness and support of those living with HIV and AIDS, becoming recognized in a big way thanks to actor Jeremy Irons wearing one during the televised Tony Awards.

♦  After seeing the attention that the red ribbons brought to the HIV/AIDS cause, the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation gave out pink ribbons to participants in its Komen Race for the Cure® in New York City later that same year.

The pink ribbon gained national recognition

While all of this was going on, Charlotte Haley of Simi Valley, CA, was handing out homemade peach-colored ribbons attached to cards that urged a call to action for better funding for breast cancer prevention. Her grassroots campaign gained enough attention that Self magazine contacted her in 1992 wishing to work together, along with cosmetics giant Estée Lauder, on a ribbon campaign coordinated with their second annual Breast Cancer Awareness Month issue. Haley felt they would commercialize the effort and turned the magazine down. The ribbon color was changed from peach to pink and they were handed out at cosmetics counters in New York City. Together with the Self magazine issue, this marketing move brought the pink ribbon and the meaning behind it to national attention.

Speed Cleaning wishes continuing good health and hope for all cancer survivors as we observe Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2015.

 

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